For Another’s Freedom: Bulgarian Rebel Leaders Who Fought to Liberate Greece (written for ArchaeologyinBulgaria.com)

On March 25 (6 April, Greg.Calendar), the Feast of Annunciation, 1821, Bishop Palaion Patron Germanos proclaimed the national uprising against the Ottoman Empire and blessed the flag of the Greek War of Independence at the Monastery of Agia Lavra. Painting by Ludovico Lipparini (1800-1856), National Historic Museum Greece
(*This history feature article was written by Ivan Dikov for Pax Glocalica's sister publication ArchaeologyinBulgaria.com)

Bulgaria and Greece are (the) two European countries that are about as ancient as it gets. But possibly the first thing that comes to mind regarding their relations in historical terms are the horrific, back-stabbing Modern Era wars the two contemporary nation-states fought in the 20th century. Continue reading “For Another’s Freedom: Bulgarian Rebel Leaders Who Fought to Liberate Greece (written for ArchaeologyinBulgaria.com)”

How Bulgarian Rebels ‘Determined’ the Prime Minister of Britain: William Gladstone and ‘the Question of the East’ (written for ArchaeologyinBulgaria.com)

William Gladstone, four times Prime Minister of Britain (1868-1874, 1880-1885, 1886, 1892-1894), who used the Bulgarian case to stage a vigorous attack on the policies of the Conservative Party government of his arch-rival, Lord Disraeli. Photo: Wikipedia
(*This history feature article was written by Ivan Dikov for Pax Glocalica's sister publication ArchaeologyinBulgaria.com)

April 20, 1876 – The Bulgarians are making history their largest rebellion so far (later to be known as the April Uprising) against the Ottoman Empire in their quest for freedom and an independent nation state; meanwhile, in Britain, former Prime Minister and Liberal Party leader William Gladstone has been in opposition for two years to Prime Minister and Conservative Party leader Benjamin Disraeli. Continue reading “How Bulgarian Rebels ‘Determined’ the Prime Minister of Britain: William Gladstone and ‘the Question of the East’ (written for ArchaeologyinBulgaria.com)”

Terrorism as It Once Was: The Miss Stone Affair, America, Bulgaria, and the Ottoman Empire (written for ArchaeologyinBulgaria.com)

Protestant missionary Miss Ellen Stone is seen here at her arrival back in the United States after her six-month abduction by the Bulgarian freedom-fighters, i.e. the Miss Stone Affair. Photo: Wikimedia Commons
(*This history feature article was written by Ivan Dikov for Pax Glocalica's sister publication ArchaeologyinBulgaria.com)

The dramedy of the Miss Stone Affair is a stunning episode of history which teaches about courage and integrity in the struggle for freedom. And about Stockholm Syndrome. Continue reading “Terrorism as It Once Was: The Miss Stone Affair, America, Bulgaria, and the Ottoman Empire (written for ArchaeologyinBulgaria.com)”

The EU That Should Have Pulled Itself Together Long before Trump

European Council President Donald Tusk has been outspoken in naming the threats to the EU. But to what end? Photo: Tusk on Twitter

The good people of the EU have had every chance to solidify their supra-national state as a benevolent power but didn’t.

Also, between Donald Trump and Donald Tusk, I like Donald Duck best… Continue reading “The EU That Should Have Pulled Itself Together Long before Trump”

Will Trump Let Eastern Europe Be ‘Trumpled’? By Russia or by Turkey?

Is this Cold War sign from West Berlin what’s awaiting Eastern Europe under America’s new President Donald Trump? Photo: Wikipedia

In the past few years, the cornerstone of Eastern Europe’s progress, the US security umbrella, has started to seem increasingly, and dreadfully, shaky. Continue reading “Will Trump Let Eastern Europe Be ‘Trumpled’? By Russia or by Turkey?”